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Monday, August 14, 2006

Helping College Students Become Better Writers

Can a website really help college kids become better writers? LousyWriter.com thinks so. In an era where "Instant Message Shorthand" is the defacto way to write, their aim is to make college students better at the written word. (Good luck with that!)

Here's a blurb from their homepage;

LousyWriter.com obeys the rules of Plain English. We favor smaller and familiar words instead of big or foreign words. Great scholars and writers and exceptional speakers use simple words. Today's dictionaries are bloated with over 500,000 words, but good writers need to harness only a small fraction of this number.

LousyWriter.com wants you to become a good writer. Good writing makes you sound intelligent and makes you look professional. These two benefits alone have a positive effect in your business career and personal life.Use

LousyWriter.com to learn how to write, how to use words, how to write sentences, and how to communicate effectively.

Lets hope they can make a dent in improving our kids writing skills.

4 comments:

Anonymous said...

>>In an era where "Instant Message Shorthand" is the defacto way to write, their aim is to make college students better at the written word. (Good luck with that!)<<
>>Lets hope they can make a dent in improving our kids writing skills.<<

Perhaps someone should start with his own? Perhaps he should fix the misplaced antecedent? Perhaps he should realize the sentence should read " ... our kids' writing skills."

Earlier in the post, "de facto" should be italicized.

Any post or comment about good writing should, in fact, encompass said skill.

C.M Russell said...

Boy, somebody has too much time on their hands if they're criticizing my punctuation.

I'll put my writing skills up against any college kids' day or night. There's a big difference between good writing and a missing apostrophe.

Anonymous said...

>>Boy, somebody has too much time on their hands if they're criticizing my punctuation.<<

Thank you for making my point *again*. Subject/verb agreement is also an important writing skill.

Perhaps you should see http://alt-usage-english.org/humorousrules.html

C.M Russell said...

Whatever.